About People for Media

Ordinary people advocating media ethics and literacy

‘How contraceptive methods turn women into liars’

Found this on the Inquirer’s letters section today. A woman reacts to one of the paper’s editorials and frankly shares her feelings about contraception and the RH bill.

The Mother’s Day editorial (“For mothers and their kids,” Inquirer, 5/13/12), using a “CNN hero” to call for the swift passage of the Reproductive Health bill, must have been written under a certain spell. Our Magna Carta for Women, which just needs to be implemented, more than covers all our needs.

As the Philippine Medical Association itself said: Contraception turns women into liars. “I give myself to you entirely,” I tell my husband, “but I don’t give you a key part of me: my fertility!”

I tell you: when my husband was using a condom, I could feel na ginagamit niya lang ako. I’ve told him so; and he has been so good as to change his behavior.

Is the Inquirer really pro-women? Or has the Inquirer just been victimized and fallen under the spell of the materialistic, animalistic, amoral and atheistic brainwashing of the powerful media of the degenerate West?

—YVONNE CHAN-DE LOS REYES

Read the whole article on the Inquirer website »

Advertisements

Senator underestimates sensitivity of Filipinos

Thank you, Ms Sagra, for this enlightening comment.

On TV news last Nov. 25, our very assertive senator dished out sex like she were giving out lollipops to little kids. In that one minute or so coverage, her message must have sunk deep into the nation’s viewing audience.

What was very alarming was her sweeping statement that if you do not like sex, you’ve got to see a doctor because you are abnormal. What for? Because of a brain damage or something? Isn’t she aware that there are many people who opt out of sex for higher dimensions of spirituality? Surely priests and nuns, bishops and cardinals and, above all, the pope are not abnormal people, considering the responsibilities they are holding.

By endorsing a piece of legislation like the RH bill, this senator was expected by the people to do a candid but dignified handling of the topic because controversy over this issue has been raging for months. But no, she seemed to be taking it lightly, somewhat jokingly without regard to the repercussions of her pronouncements. And to think that it was a lady-senator who could have been our president telling university students to buy condoms if they could no longer suppress their sexual urges. It sounds like she was encouraging the indiscriminate use of condoms. No, madam senator, not that easy, not that fast. You have to be married first and, in a Christian society, we follow rules. Rules that preserve life, and rules that do not kill.

You have overlooked the fact that Filipinos have dignity and moral values. They don’t copulate like dogs by the roadside to satisfy a sexual urge. You underestimate the sensitivity of Filipino society. Please do not bark this way or the big bone will fall from your mouth.

—ESPERANZA M. SAGRA,

retired principal,
Surallah, South Cotabato;
espersagra @yahoo.com

from Inquirer.net

‘Positive outlook, right suggestions’

IN another letter to the Inquirer, regular reader Fr. Cesilio Magsino is happily surprised by the paper’s “wise suggestions” with regard to a supposed impending world food crisis.

What a whiff of fresh air! That’s how I felt after reading the Inquirer’s June 16 editorial (“The coming crisis”) about the impending world food crisis. When I began reading it, I was all but set to jump to the conclusion that the Inquirer would surely recommend to curb our population growth so that there would be enough food for everyone. How glad I was to realize I was mistaken! There was no mention of such an idea.

Read the rest of the letter at the Inquirer website >>